Kosovo's language specific discrimination of women in labor market 

When a publishing job calls, many Kosovo employers use gender-specific language. This practice, which discourages women from applying for certain jobs, is considered a barrier to gender equality.

Lidija Pisker
Lidija Pisker NewsMavens, Balkans
Kosovo's language specific discrimination of women in labor market  - NewsMavens
Woman. Pexels

Why this story matters:

Kosovo's laws are explicit that job calls must be free of any form of discrimination. But even governmental institutions don't comply with the legislation. 

The Labor Inspectorate of Kosovo published an internal job call for the position of "Labor Inspector" (in the masculine form) in October this year, Kosovo 2.0. reported. The call was written in gender-insensitive language implying that the position should be taken by a man.

In 2016, the Labor Inspectorate opened another job vacancy for the position of "Director of the Regional Division for Coordination," again in masculine form. Kosovo 2.0 received no response to the interview request from the Ministry of Labor and Social Welfare and the Labor Inspectorate. 

The practice of limiting women to only certain professions maintains gender stereotypes and discourages women empowerment. Some governments might not care about gender equality, but they should at least remember that diversity is good for the economy, too.

Details from the story:

  • Kosovo's Labor Law, the Law against Discrimination, the Law for Civil Service and the Law for Gender Equality state that any form of discrimination in access to work is prohibited. 
  • The Labor Force Survey conducted by the Kosovo Agency of Statistics in the second quarter of 2018 showed an employment rate of 12 percent among women, Kosovo 2.0. reported. 
  • One of the reasons for the low level of employment among women are "job calls which use discriminatory language," according to the Gap Institute's 2017 report. 
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