How migrants' values adapt after moving to Sweden

After Sweden accepted huge numbers of migrants and refugees in 2015, integration has been a hotly debated topic. A new study suggests that migrants' values adapt after moving to the Nordic country.

Catherine Edwards
Catherine Edwards NewsMavens, Sweden
How migrants' values adapt after moving to Sweden - NewsMavens
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Why this story matters:

The Migrant World Values Survey was carried out because of the low proportion of migrants included in existing values studies, such as the World Values Survey. The survey suggested that most migrants adapt well to life in Sweden, with most feeling secure and at home, and nearly three quarters feeling proud of Sweden.

On average, the migrants questioned were more likely than native Swedes to say they found homosexuality, abortion, divorce, sex before marriage, and abortion "never acceptable", and compared to native Swedes they typically had more traditional views on family and gender, such as believing men were responsible for providing for their families.

But the values of migrants in Sweden were typically much closer to Sweden on the so-called culture map than the average values of residents of their home countries were.

The researcher behind the study said this indicated a "relatively fast switch" to Swedish values such as gender equality and democracy.

Details from the story:

  • 57 percent of those questioned felt "very at home" in Sweden, and a further 32 percent "quite at home"
  • More than half of those surveyed had arrived in Sweden as refugees
  • Around 6,500 migrants all across Sweden were questioned for the survey
  • Most of those questioned said they had experienced a better quality of life in Sweden compared to their home country when it came to educational opportunities, freedom of speech, housing and healthcare, although work opportunities did not live up to expectations
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