Public relations opportunities overtake journalism students in Montenegro

One third of journalism students do not plan to work as journalists upon graduation, a survey conducted by the Trade Union of Media of Montenegro shows. Instead, they see themselves in public relations or other jobs.

Lidija Pisker
Lidija Pisker NewsMavens, Balkans
Public relations opportunities overtake journalism students in Montenegro - NewsMavens
Newspaper & computer, WikiCommons

Why this story matters:

Journalists moving -- or looking to move -- into the Public Relations industry is a trend, not only in Montenegro but in countries around the world.

And it's not surprising. 

Career prospects in journalism are in decline -- journalists generally cope with noncompetitive salaries and long working hours, the stability of their jobs is jeopardized by drops in circulations and increased competition among numerous online media outlets. Last year, Montenegro registered several cases of threats to and attacks on journalists, most of them still unpunished. Some weeks ago, a journalist was shot in the leg in front of her home in the capital of Podgorica, which was already a second attack on her. 

Still, this lack of interest is depressing. Journalists are supposed to challenge those in power, not flirt with them. Journalists should look for the truth, not for tricks on how to put a positive spin on the actions of their clients. If anyone, journalism students should be the ones to maintain the mission of journalism. And they should be the most enthusiastic about it. 

Details from the story:

  • More than half of the surveyed students consider the position of journalists in Montenegro as unsatisfactory or bad.
  • 45% of respondents said they wanted to be "socially engaged" as the reason for enrolling into journalism school. Only 7% of them were motivated by salary. 
  • About a third of respondents do not see themselves working in journalism. 
Cybercracy, or how echo chambers hack liberal democracy - NewsMavens
Euractiv

Cybercracy, or how echo chambers hack liberal democracy

Karolina Zbytniewska
Karolina ZbytniewskaEuractiv, Europe
inbox_large_illu Created with Sketch.
Tired of the news media’s prevailing male perspective? We are too.

Get our newsletters composed exclusively by female journalists from all over Europe.

WITH FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM:
SUPPORTED BY:

Project #Femfacts co-financed by European Commission Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology as part of the Pilot Project – Media Literacy For All

The information and views set out on this website are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official opinion of the European Union. Neither the European Union institutions and bodies nor any person acting on their behalf may be held responsible for the use which may be made of the information contained therein.

STRATEGIC PARTNERS:
NewsMavens
NewsMavens is a media start-up within Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland's largest liberal broadsheet published by Agora S.A. NewsMavens is currently financed by Gazeta Wyborcza and Google DNI Fund.
Is something happening in your country that Newsmavens should cover?
CORE TEAM
Zuzanna Ziomecka
Zuzanna Ziomecka EDITOR IN CHIEF
Lea Berriault-Jauvin
Lea Berriault Managing Editor
Jessica Sirotin
Jessica Sirotin EDITOR
Ada Petriczko
Ada Petriczko EDITOR
Gazeta Wyborcza, Agora SA Czerska 8/10 00-732, Warsaw Poland
The e-mail addresses provided above are not intended for recruitment purposes. Messages concerning recruitment will be deleted immediately. Your personal data provided as part of your correspondence with Zuzanna,Lea, Jessica and Ada will be processed for the purpose of resolving the issue you contacted us about. The data provided in your email is controlled by Agora S.A. with its registered office in Warsaw Czerska 8/10 Street (00-732). You can find more information about the processing and protection of your personal data at https://newsmavens.com/transparency-policy